Near Field Communication (NFC) is a technology that enables close-range wireless communication between devices. It allows devices to exchange data by simply touching them together or by bringing them close to each other, typically within a range of a few centimeters.

NFC is a short-range wireless technology that operates at 13.56 MHz frequency and uses radio-frequency identification (RFID) for data transmission. It is a secure and efficient way to transfer data between devices, and it can be used for a wide range of applications, including mobile payments, access control, and data exchange.

One common use of NFC is in mobile payments, where it allows users to make payments by simply tapping their smartphone against a point-of-sale terminal. This eliminates the need for users to enter their payment information manually or swipe a credit card, making the payment process faster and more convenient.

NFC can also be used for access control, such as unlocking doors or starting a car. For example, an NFC-enabled smartphone can be used to unlock a door by simply tapping it against an NFC reader.

In addition to these applications, NFC can also be used for data exchange between devices. For example, two NFC-enabled smartphones can be used to exchange contacts, photos, or other types of data simply by touching them together or bringing them close to each other.

Overall, NFC is a convenient and secure technology that enables close-range communication between devices, making it easier to make payments, access buildings and vehicles, and exchange data.